Manage Youtube Subscriptions Besides Insurance, How Can a Business Prepare for a Hurricane?

Any insurance professional will stress the importance of a good commercial policy that includes wind and hail as well as flood coverage in relation to protecting your business from the elements. Case in point is the fact that many stricken by current hurricanes do not even own flood insurance.We won’t get into the implications of damages and losses recovery in regard to this unfortunate set of circumstances. Suffice it to say, in wake of the destruction, these home and business owners have to deal with the financial stress on their own, save for whatever government assistance they can get.Besides having a proper insurance plan in place, businesses can prepare for the worst weather scenarios by doing the following.Review your company’s impact study:


• Make a tally of what type of losses you may incur.• Consider the amount of risk loss and severity probability that may impact your business.• Look over your business process flow agenda: Should one portion of your company become unworkable, assign another unit to take over.• Choose which operations are vital for continued survival and recovery.• Ensure all records of sales and customer-base, as well as tax data and documents are stored in a secure off-site location.• Assign others to take over executive management if those in place are not able to carry out duties.Partner with Other Businesses• Have vendors ready to outsource services in case of a hurricane disaster.• Mark down important vendor and business partners and store this info in an off-site multiple employee-accessible location.Make Alternate Plans for your Facility• Contemplate the use of other locations in the event your main office is rendered inaccessible or inoperable.• Plan for security of people and property.Ensure Payroll Efficiency• If it is pertinent, ensure the vendors you will deal with understand how to continue with payroll.• Partner with your vendors to ensure employee info is stored securely in an off-site location.Team up with Other Operations• Group together with other corporations at your building site to prepare for continued business in a weather-induced crisis.


• Reach out to emergency personnel and power companies to show them how you operations are conducted.• Devise a plan together with your suppliers, shippers and others you rely on so that you will know how to carry on in the event of an emergency.Keep Up with Your Protection Plans• Review your plans on how to deal with an emergency situation yearly. Revise them if you feel changes need to be made.• Conduct consistent emergency drills.Risk control is part of any major insurance company’s policyholder’s benefits. Contact an independent agency that does direct business with many of the leading providers for more information on how your company can protect itself from a hurricane or other natural disaster.

Fear This My Fellow Athlete

Competition is good, just as fear is good – if you will use it to your advantage rather than letting it use you. Fear can frazzle us to make mistakes, become uncertain, and anxious, but fear used to our advantage can propel us to greatness. It’s a double-edged sword. Since fear is internal, you own it, it’s yours to use as you will, if you ignore it, it might hurt you, if you use it, it can help you, give you the edge, especially in competition. How might I know this?

Well, I supposed any seasoned competitor in the human endeavor or athlete understands exactly what I am saying, but in case you need more examples to help you better understand this concept, by all means keep reading.

Recently, I read an interesting article online and watched a great video sponsored by Expert Sports Performance, the video was titled: “How Talented Athletes Deal with Fear,” by Loren Fogelman, a well-known sports psychologist.

In my view I believe that Fear is a wonderful thing, a huge driver of the human psyche, but Loren Fogelman reminds me of the truth that: “it motivates some and stops others dead in their tracks,” which is absolutely a fact.

Still, I believe that if FEAR stops someone from achieving or causes them to choke under pressure, then I would submit to you that:

1.) They don’t understand what fear is; and,
2.) They are not using FEAR as an adrenal shot for peak performance

Well, I say; too bad for them, if they are competing against me or my team. Fear can be a weakness if you let it, or high-octane when you need it, YOU decide which. “It’s all in your head” I always say. Anyway, that’s the way I see it. A great book to read is: “Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway!” published by in the 80s as a motivational type book.

As a competitive runner, I used to imagine footsteps behind me and ready to pass. Interestingly enough, I was a pretty good athlete so that didn’t happen much, but when it actually did happen it’s a sound you never forget. This imagination during competitive races propelled me to stay on pace or increase my speed opening up a large gap between me and the other runners. Sometimes when I am out training even today, I will listen to my feet hit the trail and pick up the sounds of the echo and amplify them in my brain to simulate those ever-feared footsteps, thus, propelling me to run faster and faster.